Monthly Archives: June 2011

Well, well.  I was checking my news feeds this AM and I see this post about project Spartan.

http://techcrunch.com/2011/06/15/facebook-project-spartan/

Seems that there’s a top-secret project at Facebook to implement an app delivery service on Safari to target the iPhone and iPad.  It also seems that the social media giant is working on a major update to their photo apps:

http://techcrunch.com/2011/06/15/facebook-photo-sharing-app/

I know many small business contacts who still shy away from Facebook not sure how to leverage their time there.

What this means to you, if you are a small business client, or just someone who follows our blog for tech advice and strategy is that if you haven’t figured out how to use Facebook to connect, network, and grow your business yet, you need to do that.  LinkedIn is a great business, professional networking site, but at this point it should be pretty clear to most of us that the mobile world is going to be very important to our future in business communication and networking.  Already, we use our phones constantly, most calls are mobile-to-mobile these days, and we use email, messaging, and more constantly.  Its only natural that social media would make that migration too.

And Facebook is putting resources and effort into being a major mobile social media player.  It will help you if you are comfortable using it.  As usual, if you want help, we’re happy to provide consulting and assistance.

So get in there!

I don’t often do this, write a recommendation to avoid someone’s hosting services, however, this example of incompetence is so strong that I feel I need to say something.

I was helping a client migrate from shared hosting (as in shared with other unconnected businesses) on 1&1 to their own  hosting solution.  We moved the domain to the new solution, leaving name service pointed to the 1&1 hosting, to protect the clients active email boxes, until we could make a careful planned migration of the email, hoping to avoid interruption.

A few weeks in, 1&1 deleted the remaining hosting account.  Yep.

They just deleted their customers digital property, without asking, checking anything, or keeping a back-up.  Worse, they defended the action by saying we should not have moved the name registration, which demonstrates a complete failure to understand basic concepts about how name registration works.  What we did, was basically the same as having a domain registered with Godaddy and hosting it somewhere else.  Millions of accounts are set-up that way.

So, my client lost email service in the middle of the business day, for a whole day while we moved DNS, and lost correspondence.

All 1&1 had to do was check their logs, or name service, to see live data in the account.

Deleting your customer’s property, without contacting anyone or checking anything, then telling the customer they are in the wrong, is just horrible customer care.

I am sorry to have to say; Don’ t host with 1&1, just don’t do it.  Their disrespect for this customer was frightening.